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Should I Cut or Bulk? The Definitive Guide

Ahh, the eternal question. But before I answer it, let me point out that yes, I used the word bulk, because that’s probably what you Googled. But actually, “bulk” should be removed from your vocabulary. The term implies rapid weight gain likely to put on unnecessary body fat, leaving you frustrated and forcing you to cut your gaining phase short. Thus, from here on out, I’ll use the terminology “gaining”.

However, before considering rates of weight gain (or loss for that matter), you might be thinking, “Hold on, I don’t know if I should be trying to gain muscle or lose fat in the first place!” In this, you are not alone. If I had a nickel for every time someone asked me, “Should I bulk or cut?”…well, let’s just say I’d need an additional room in my home just for piggy banks.

The answer to this question depends on more than just your current body composition. It’s not quite as simple as saying: cut if you are high in body fat, gain if you are not. There is also an interaction with training experience.

Advice for Obese Individuals

I wouldn’t advise someone with obesity who is just starting a weight training program to purposely start tracking and weighing to achieve a targeted amount of energy restriction (although there is nothing wrong with simply adopting healthier eating habits such as consuming more fruits, vegetables, protein, and water). Just becoming more active alone can give someone who was previously sedentary more finely tuned hunger signals 1, and body-fat percentage will go down even if muscle is gained without fat mass losses. Also, metabolic health will improve purely from resistance training without dieting. In this case, I’d only advise you to institute a caloric deficit once the initial “magic” of newbie gains end, and if at that point you still had a goal of lowering your body fat (which as I said, may happen anyway just from lifting regularly).

Those Who Are ‘Skinny Fat’

In the case of someone who is generally not very muscular, but is also higher in body fat than average (often referred to as “skinny fat”; I’m not a fan of the term, but it hopefully helps you understand what I’m referring to), I also don’t recommend cutting. However, I also don’t really recommend gaining at the rates I recommend later in this chapter for novices either.

In this case, once again, just let the magic of partaking in serious progressive resistance exercise (for specifics, check out our Muscle and Strength Training book—sample programs also free on this site here) do its thing for 6 months, without focusing on instituting a significant deficit or surplus. With a low starting level of muscle mass, you’re ripe for putting on muscle regardless of your nutrition (outside of it being totally off base). After letting this initial phase occur, you will probably have a much better foundation to work from.

When the Cut or Bulk Decision Is Clearer

The times the answer to this question are cut and dry, is when you aren’t a novice. If you have a few years under your belt of training, and you fit into the “intermediate” or “advanced” categories (defined later in this chapter of the book), gaining or cutting does pretty much just come down to your body fat level.

However, the answer to this question is also not as critically important as you might believe. There is a common notion that if you aren’t reasonably lean, efforts at gaining will produce a disproportionate amount of fat and little in the way of muscle. This concept is called your ‘P-ratio’, which is simply defined as the proportion of fat to muscle you put on when gaining weight. Indeed, there is research showing that very lean people—who are naturally lean, not who dieted—gain more lean body mass during periods of overfeeding, and people with obesity gain more body fat during periods of overfeeding 2.

However, what two things that are frequently misunderstood are: 1) putting on more lean body mass when overfeeding occurs in naturally lean people who walk around lean. If you dieted to get really lean, your body if anything, is actually a bit more primed for fat storage. Also; 2) that this relationship is based on observations of individuals who aren’t resistance training.

If you start lifting weights this drastically changes the game. Nutrient partitioning in your now highly active skeletal muscle is much more favorable for muscle gain as you are providing a stimulus for growth and regularly depleting your muscle of energy and pushing them to become energy efficient and adapt.

If it was true that individuals with a high body fat couldn’t gain muscle mass effectively, sumo wrestlers wouldn’t have the highest recorded lean body masses of any athlete…but they do 3. Likewise, super heavyweight powerlifters would be weaker than weight classes below them, but they aren’t.

Now don’t get me wrong, this isn’t a license to go on a dreamer permabulk! But rather, I’m saying don’t be the guy who is afraid to enter a surplus because they aren’t 8% body fat (or the gal who is afraid because they aren’t 16%).

The Difference in Body Fat for Men and Women

Men and women have different ‘essential body fat’ levels—the body fat essential to life and physiological function (largely not subcutaneous body fat). Meaning, even in shredded, stage condition, a female competitor will be at a higher body-fat percentage than a male. While individual differences do come into play, on average this value is around 2-4% for men and 8-12% for women. Thus, I often present examples of bodybuilding contest condition in this text as around 4% body fat for men, and 12% body fat for women (actually, measuring body fat accurately is another story, which we’ll cover in the Making Adjustments and Measuring Progress section). Likewise, when I present body fat examples of men and women they will be ~8% apart and should be seen as equivalent.

Limits to How Much Body Fat You Should Gain

There probably should be some limit to how high your body fat is before you decide it would be better to cut versus bulk, but it’s for logistical reasons, not “anabolic resistance”.

Essentially, you don’t want to only get a month or two out of your gaining phase before you have to diet. If you are a powerlifter you don’t want to be too far above your weight class, and for bodybuilders, you don’t want to be too far off your stage weight. In either case, the inevitable diet to come will be unnecessarily hard or long if you are.

Likewise, for recreational lifters, you probably don’t want to be so high in body fat at the start of a gaining phase that you aren’t happy with your body shortly after starting it. Essentially, in each case, you want enough of a runway to be able to spend at least a few months in a surplus.

My rough guidelines are a maximum of ~15% body fat for men and ~23% body fat for women for beginning a gaining phase. After starting, allow your body fat to climb ~3–5% in the course of a gaining phase before you do a brief ‘mini cut’ (I’ll bring this concept up throughout the text, but for a full description see the end of The Recovery Diet section) to clean things up a tad before you rinse and repeat.

But remember, this is The Muscle and Strength Pyramid, not the constantly-cutting-to-be-aesthetic (but not actually succeeding) pyramid. A general recommendation (for those who aren’t starting with a high body fat level) is to have a minimum of a 4:1 ratio of the time spent in a gaining phase vs a cutting phase. Thus, if you spent four months in a surplus putting on muscle, you earned yourself no more than one month to do a mini cut.

Now, the tough part is actually assessing your body fat level (see the ‘Making Adjustments and Measuring Progress’ section of the book—also covered on this site here, here, and here). Everyone stores body fat differently. Also, having more or less muscle mass can make a given body fat level look better or worse. So in the end, just make your best guess as to whether you are below or above the cut-off. If you are somewhere in the range where either a cutting or gaining phase could be appropriate and you can’t tell where you fall and what you should do, don’t worry, it doesn’t matter which you choose to do. You hopefully realized that though, now that you are no longer under the false impression that your gaining phase will be sabotaged if you don’t start it lean enough.

I (meaning Andy) have recorded a quick video guide using coaching client photos as examples to help you estimate your body fat percentage here:

Note that it’s common for people to over-estimate how much muscle mass they have. So, after identifying someone who you believe fits your body type, click through to see what their lifting stats were. If they were a lot stronger than you, they probably carry more muscle mass than you, which means you won’t look as good as them when you have finished your cut. There’s nothing you can do about that but it’s something you need to be aware of to avoid disappointment.


Cut or Bulk? Summary Guidelines

  • Don’t try to get super lean before doing a gaining phase, you’ll be so hungry you’ll gain too quickly, and after dieting to a very lean level you’re actually more primed for fat storage. Don’t diet to the point where you are really feeling food deprived and hungry (this often around 8–10% or lower for men and 16–18% or lower for women, but also depends on how you dieted).
  • If you’re a novice trainee with obesity or who is starting with a relatively high body-fat level, train hard for 6 months, establish a basic structure with your eating and then reassess. You might find you substantially improved your body composition.
  • If you’re a novice trainee who is both higher in body fat than they’d like (but not overweight) and also doesn’t have much muscle mass yet, just eat around maintenance (the point where you are not gaining or losing weight) and train hard for 6 months, then reassess.
  • For the non-novice male over 15% body fat or female over 23%, you can go into a surplus for a gaining phase and you will put on muscle, but it will come with some body fat as well. If you don’t want to push your body fat too far over these levels, you should consider a fat loss phase first.
  • For the non-novice male up to 15% body fat or female up to 23%, it’s fine to start a gaining phase. For competitors, you’ll probably be able to push it until you gain 3–5% more body-fat percentage points before you should consider a mini cut. This will ensure your next contest prep diet isn’t more difficult. For non-competitors, in my experience, this point is where many (but not all people) want to trim up. However, you should know it’s not unhealthy at all to be in the high-teens of body fat for a male, or high-twenties for a female.

You can calculate your macros in 60 seconds using my free calorie and macro calculator here.

The Muscle and Strength Pyramid: Nutrition v2.0

If you have found this helpful, you might be pleased to know it is just a small section taken from our Muscle and Strength Nutrition Pyramid book. The second edition, along with the Training companion book, was released this January 3rd, 2019.

Join 20,000+ other readers, get your copies here.

Thank you for reading. Questions welcomed in the comments.

– Eric, Andy, and Andrea


» Reference List

  1. Beaulieu, K., et al., Homeostatic and non-homeostatic appetite control along the spectrum of physical activity levels: An updated perspective. Physiol Behav, 2018. 1(192): p. 23-29
  2. Forbes, G.B., Body fat content influences the body composition response to nutrition and exercise. Ann N Y Acad Sci, 2000. 904(1): p. 359-65.
  3. Kondo, M., et al., Upper limit of fat‐free mass in humans: A study on Japanese Sumo wrestlers. Am J Hum Biol, 1994. 6(5): p. 613–8.

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jane
jane

Hey Andy,
Im a 23 year old woman who is 5’2 and I weigh about 121 lbs. The problem is I have been weightlifting for about 3 years but I feel like I havent made significant change. my body fat percentage is about 23-25. But I actually do not eat a lot. Max 1500-1600 calories. I was wondering If recomp would help me gain more strength? because If I lower my calories I just lose strength instead of bodyfat. However reading this article I dnt think Im a beginner when it comes to weight lifting. Im not really sure what I should do? cut to lose the bodyfat? bulk to gain strength and muscle? recomp?
thank you

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Jane, much as this sucks to hear, if you’re not losing weight (and that is your goal) you need to eat less. This is not unusual for someone of your size.

Whether you choose to go this route is only something you can decide. If you’re three years into your training and have been sleeping well, managing stress, training with sufficient intensity and volume, then a recomp is likely off the cards and you need to choose one direction or the other.

Ethan
Ethan

Hi I’m a high school athlete 5’9 @ 164 lb. and have dropped sports like football and an MMA club I participated in and replaced them with water polo and diving after i dislocated my leg and tore my Achilles but I’ve noticed I have maintained a 9.5 to 10 % body fat percentage and I leaned out in some areas like my core while I bulked in others like my chest and shoulders and now I know this is a result of using these muscles more often now resulting in them getting stronger but I cant seem to manage a balance and I seem to be stuck at this weight and body fat % . Is there anything I can do to gain weight and drop my percentage down without fearing going straight back to my previous weight?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Ethan,

Gaining weight while dropping body-fat percentage is something that skinny-fat noobs to training in the 13-20% bf range might achieve, but for someone who has a decent level of training experience and is at such a low body fat percentage already, this is just not a realistic outcome.

Andrew Chelpon
Andrew Chelpon

Hey Andy, I have been a bit stuck lately. I am 150 Ibs and 5’8. I have about 18% body fat and a low to medium amount of muscle. I was wondering how I can get to around 12% body fat but also gain a decent amount of muscle. I am not new to lifting and am wondering if I should bulk or cut or maintain weight. Hopefully you can help me.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Well, you can try setting your calories at maintenance level and seeing if you get a recomp effect, but if you stall, you need to focus on one goal or the other.

Jonny Hillman
Jonny Hillman

Hey Andy, I’m a 6’2”, 210 pound, 19 year old college athlete. My bf% is about 12-14. I want to be at 6-8% in 6 months but still have a bulked body builder look. My questions are, is this possible or out of reach? Should I begin with cutting? And any other suggestions for diet calculations?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Jonny,

1) Well, it’s a subjective question, not clearly defined, so I have to guess what you’re asking in order to answer.

It sounds like you’re asking if you can lean out to an exceptionally lean state, close to competition levels, and gain a significant amount of muscle to achieve the look of someone who has put in a lifetime of training. As you know from the article + common sense. This is not possible.

2) This is what the article is here to help you decide. I don’t know you and can’t do that for you.

3) Yes. My calorie and macro calculator is here.

Will
Will

Hey, so I’m struggling a bit here.. I’ve been cutting for 2 years, lost 190ish lbs, and have some overuse injuries. I’m 5’10”, 190lbs, and work out 4 times a week, and I’m dealing with hip pain, tennis elbow, and shoulder soreness. I think I’m using a decent program, and I have a local trainer who is well known in the area. I’ve just discovered you guys and I want to grab your books when I can, but in the mean time I’d appreciate any input. I’d like to cut about 10 more lbs, but I’m figuring I shouldn’t cut while injured. Is there research on overuse injuries healing over time in a deficit? I’ve been trying to lean bulk since august with no apparent progress.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Will. Congrats on losing half of your body weight! Sounds like you need to take some time off. I wouldn’t diet anymore, come to maintenance (guide here). Train as you can without adding to the soreness or hampering recovery.

If you need complete time off from training and most cardio, consider swimming, or the cross-trainer as they are low impact but work the full body. Sure, less than traditional strength training but the point is to keep doing something.

Chris
Chris

Hi Andy, what do you recommend to someone who is burnt out from cutting but yet didn’t manage to lean out much . I’ve lost 12 lbs but took me 16 weeks because of interruptions from life . I’m mentally burnt hungry a lot and very lethargic most of the time .I’m maybe 15% BF if I had to guess . Should I bulk or try maintenance for while then try to get leaner . My experience in past ,of bulking when not too lean only lasted 4 months before started storing unwanted fat . I’m your typical skinny fat type . My diet is always on point my training is good but but my cuts always seem to get lengthened and interrupted by life events . Thank you for taking my question

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Chris. Take a diet break.

Chris
Chris

Thanks Andy I will take your advice , cheers

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Most welcome.

Jenna
Jenna

I´m currently cutting until I reach around 22% bf in order to start a reverse diet and lean bulk. However I`m not sure what my body fat percentage is because every method I try has widely different results. Measurements show 27% but calipers show 23%. How do I know when to cut and bulk based on my body fat if it isn´t accurate?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Jenna. The when to cut-bulk are just general guidelines, not hard and fast rules. So, cut until you feel comfortable, knowing you’ll regain some fat when you bulk.

Brad Ekegren
Brad Ekegren

I’m a 30 year old ectomorph with very little muscle mass @ 12.7% body fat. Should I cut down to 10% before I start bulking?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Definitely not.

Lorenz
Lorenz

Hi Andy, there are some lines in this article that really confuse me after I read some of your other articles.

In this article, it says:

“However, what two things that are frequently misunderstood are: 1) putting on more lean body mass when overfeeding occurs in naturally lean people who walk around lean. If you dieted to get really lean, your body if anything, is actually a bit more primed for fat storage.”

But when I read your article on how to bulk — https://rippedbody.com/how-to-bulk/

.. it says the opposite:

“The leaner we are; the more of the weight that we gain has potential to be muscle. There are calorie partitioning benefits to being leaner. ”

So, which is which?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

The former is probably true. Something I learned since. However, it’s advisable to still keep bf% in the 10-20% bf range for cut-bulk cycles.

Lorenz
Lorenz

I’m sorry, Andy, but can you clarify what’s more “true” in this case based on the clients you’ve coached in the previous years:

1. “after dieting to a very lean level you’re actually more primed for fat storage”

2. “The leaner we are; the more of the weight that we gain has potential to be muscle. There are calorie partitioning benefits to being leaner. ”

I am also reviewing Lyle’s article on P-ratio. There aren’t many resources out there so I’m here asking a bit of your time.

Appreciate it a lot!

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

The first is true when people are exceptionally lean (think 10% body fat). The second is believed to be true past a certain point (think 20% body fat). Between these two points, which is where I coach people, I haven’t observed a difference.

But then again, most people I coach have a preference for staying lean. So we always start things on the lower end of this range and I’m not sure I have enough experience of the upper end to say with any certainty.

Les
Les

Hi Andy,

I’m 43, 5’5 female, @ 149lbs. I lift 5 days a week. My bf is right at 20% but i would like to drop to around 16%. I previously worked with a coach to cut who continued to drop my calories (stopped working with them when cals hit around 1500). It wasn’t enough for me to push heavy weight and not seeing results, weight staying same. Slowed my metabolism? How do I correct this and what macro split % do I need to use?

Thanks

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Les, this probably not what you want to hear, but here goes…

It sounds like the coach you fired made the right move.

Energy needs change over time as we diet and bulk. Your metabolism will gradually adapt to fight a caloric deficit (this is the ‘slowed metabolism’ you refer to). These things happen for some people more than others. You’re a relatively short person. If you aren’t active outside of your five planned workouts (i.e. you do deskwork and drive most places), then needing to drop to a 1500 kcal daily average intake isn’t unusual.

There is nothing you can do to “fix” the slowed metabolism, it will naturally (and gradually) return to normal when you come back to caloric maintenance.

Changing your macro split is unlikely to do much, assuming your protein intake was sufficient.

Unless you’re totally jacked, you’re not 20% body fat at 5ft 5. So, rather than set your protein intake at your body weight, which would skew it a little too high and ‘steal’ from your ability to use those calories for carbs or fat, I’d set it a little lower at 130 g. I’d then have your fats at around 40 g (~0.25 g per pound), so that you can then have the rest of your calories as carbs to fuel your workouts (155 g).

Note that this is not a macro ratio. (Reasons covered in, “Why the ‘Best’ Macro Ratio Doesn’t Exist“.)

Rog
Rog

Hi Andy,

background: intermediate trainee, on the line between gain and cut. did a (too) slow cut at the beginning of the year, been in roughly maintenance since then.

I’m having surgery at the end of the year that will put me out of all training except cardio for at least 6 weeks, and out of heavy training for 2+ months. I’m wondering if it would be better to do a cut now or to do a gaining phase now and then cut after surgery. But I know one of the foundations of a healthy cut is heavy training in order to maintain muscle mass.

Do you have nutrition recommendations for extended periods off training? I’ve seen your recommendations for travel nutrition and am wondering if those apply.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Rog. I think the surgery is irrelevant to the decision of what you should do until that point. After the surgery, eat at maintenance.

Gilad
Gilad

Great article!

Me: 34 year old male; 14% body fat; training for years; however, I’ve neglected training my legs and started training them more seriously 6 months ago. But 3 months into training, I injured my hamstring and haven’t worked my legs since (I continued working my upper body). I’ll begin working my lower body, but obviously am starting from scratch.

[1] Assuming that my nutrition/workouts are right and I’m conservative and lose 1-2 lbs / week, how much muscle (lean mass) can I reasonably expect to lose?

[2] Given that my lower body can be considered “novice”, will they go through the newbie muscle gaining phase (although I’ve trained my upper body for years)?

Thanks!

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Gilad, thanks for the questions.
1. If you’re training right, keeping your caloric deficit at a reasonable rate (as you are) and eating sufficient protein, you won’t lose muscle.
2. Yes, and you’ll probably gain muscle there during the cut.

Gilad
Gilad

Hi Andy,

As always, thank you for the detailed response! Really appreciate your insight and articles – they’re always so helpful!

As a follow up to #2 – in that case, would it make more sense to first eat at maintenance (to take advantage of the ‘newbie gains’ for my lower body? If yes, for how long?

Thanks again for everything.

Best,
Gilad

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

If your body fat percentage is too high, I’d still recommend you cut. You’ll gain muscle while leaning out.

Gilad Segal
Gilad Segal

Hi Andy,

Thanks again for all of this. It’s all so helpful!!

Quick follow up:

[1] Can you define ‘too high’? I am 14-15% body fat (had a Dexa scan done)

[2] I currently have an injury to my lower body, which will make it difficult to workout my lower body. What should a person do then in terms catering their diet (i.e. leaning out vs. building muscle vs. maintenance)? Can I still try and lean out? My fear is that because I won’t exercise my lower body, I will begin losing muscle (instead of fat) from my lower body, even if everything else is perfect. Any thoughts/recommendations on that?

Thanks again,
Gilad

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

1. Too high for your personal preference, knowing that when you switch to a bulking phase, you will regain some fat.
2. If you diet while unable to train, you’ll lose muscle mass. So, I’d wait until you can train your lower body before proceeding.

Ash
Ash

Can you elaborate on sufficient? (1g per lb?)

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Correct. Unless you’re a vegetarian, in which case you may want to bump that by 20% to be on a par with amino acid quality.

Xuan Hoang Nguyen
Xuan Hoang Nguyen

Hey Andy! Im 18 years old, 5ft 9, around 140lbs and 10-13%. Been training for 1 year.
Im not sure if I should cut or bulk because at the moment im not so satisfied with my body fat because my abs are not really showing. But at the same time I dont want to be too “light”.
Thanks in advanced

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

I can only present the information, Xuan, you have to decide.

Jack
Jack

Hey Andy! I’m 19 years old, 6ft, 180lbs, 18%-20bf. Been training for about 3 years very consistently.

Was wondering if I could gain a considerable amount of muscle mass over a year if I just ate at maintenance every day and focus on progressive overload? Not a fan of the whole cutting/bulking because I’m young and don’t want to be wasting my prime time in a caloric deficit especially since I’m not even that strong or big to begin with.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

You’ve been training consistently for three years, so probably not.

RTB
RTB

Hi Andy,

Really appreciate all the time and effort you put into this site!

You speak about “skinny fat” folks training seriously for 6 months and letting the magic of newbie gains work before reassessing the bulk vs. cut decision. Does this advice apply to someone who is “skinny fat” because he’s taken a long break from training with lots of muscle loss and fat gain? In other words, are newbie gains a one-time phenomenon or can this strategy work when getting serious about training for a second (or third) time?

Thanks so much!

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Randall,

Lost muscle can be more quickly re-gained than new muscle mass can be accrued. Consider setting your caloric intake at maintenance or slightly above and you should be set.

Plach17
Plach17

Question: I’ve been lifting for years and only just finding out my calories were off due to overestimating my activity level. As a result my bulk brought my from 5ft 4in 155 at 15% to 176 at 30% without much muscle gain. LBM is 123. I want to cut but am worried about going bellow 145 to get to 15% again as the math is showing is likely. I am also worried considering my muscle is low that I’ll look scrawny.
Any advice? The goal is to be in the 160ish area at 12%.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

What’s done is done. If you got fat, you need to cut. Period. Next time, bulk in a more controlled fashion (guide here: How to Bulk Without Getting Fat), and ditch whatever bf% estimation you’re using as they’re all inaccurate and inconsistent (covered here, and here). Instead, track like this: How to Track Your Progress.

Thomas
Thomas

Hi! I’m 6 ‘ 1″ 225pounds. I used to be 250 then dropped down to 175 but now I’m back up to 225 with various weight training sessions. But I’ve been doing crossfit for 6 months now and I can’t see any definition, I still have a hanging belly as well. I dont know if i should lose weight to see definition or gain muscle to see if I will gain more definition. Please help?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Focus on fat loss then build up more slowly this time: How to Bulk Without Getting Fat.

Zakaria JR
Zakaria JR

Hey Andy, I started weightlifting and dieting to lose fat both 7 months ago. I lost over 40 pounds and reduced my fat percentage from 29% to 16% .. But my progress stopped for over a month and it seems impossible now to get even leaner. I’m feeling more tired and demotivated every day…

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

It’s possible, you’re just tired of dieting and/or unsure of what to do. Consider a diet break and then come back to dieting and make an adjustment. You’ll see guides for both of those things on the nutrition articles page in the menu.

Ali
Ali

So in this article for novice lifters, you only mentioned the recommendation for the obese and skinny fat novices.

What about a skinny novice lifter with a moderate to low body fat percentage who has just started out?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Ali,

If you’re a skinny novice, bulk! Guide here: How to Bulk Without Getting Fat.

Jeff Cantley
Jeff Cantley

i’m 16, 5’7” novice trainee, doing hypertrophic program using your pyramid training book. I weight ~75kg and i am probably ~20% bodyfat. The general consensus around being young is just bulk bulk bulk but i’m wondering if I should stick with your guidelines and stay at maintenance or if I should even cut maybe. Thank you.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Hi Jeff,
Given your age, height, weight, body fat, and that you’re a beginner, it’s almost certain you’ll gain muscle and lose fat at the same time if you just eat enough to hold your weight steady. I’d consider that.

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