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Switching from Six Meals – Bodybuilder Client Phil’s Story

43 years old. 3 days a week training. 2 meals/day. Zero cardio/ fat-burners/ ‘funky stuff’.

Though Phil did shed some fat, this isn’t really about that. An experienced amateur bodybuilder, he wanted to share his experiences when he switched to IF/LG principles.

Phil, as a man that has had great success using the 5-6 meals/day, high-volume training approach, can you tell us why you decided to try IF/LG?

“My wife and I are expecting our first child in December, one of the reasons I wanted to pursue consultation with you was that I knew I needed help to re-jig my lifestyle so that I had more time and energy for my wife and child, was more focused on my long term health and wellbeing, but was still able to pursue my training and physique goals.

I had achieved good results previously with the standard 5-6 meals a day model: post-workout shakes, split routines and a lot of HIIT cardio etc. But I increasingly came to recognize that the amount of time, effort and hassle involved did not seem to be a logical way to continue. I was feeling quite burnt out and fed up with all the food prep, having to carry food and drinks everywhere and struggling to squeeze enough time in my day to eat the food, albeit small poxy meals that always left me hungry. I knew there had to be a more efficient, effective and rational way of achieving the same results, but I never quite found it.

“It is quite remarkable how cut and ripped I have become in a little over 8 weeks with zero cardio, 2 meals a day and three workouts a week.”

So 8 weeks in, what are your thoughts on your condition?

I think I am at a body fat level of around 6-8%. I have not measured it, but through comparing myself to others I know who have competed as BBs and those who are regular users of GH and steroids, I am as lean as, or in most cases considerably leaner than them. It is quite remarkable how cut and ripped I have become in a little over 8 weeks with zero cardio, 2 meals a day and three workouts a week that, in comparison to others, are a fraction of the volume and time.

I had previously achieved and maintained a good level of leanness in recent years with the standard approach; I had cuts, good definition, and abs, but now I have striations, increased vascularity across my chest and abs, and deep cuts everywhere. Amazingly the hassle involved to achieve these results has been zero. Nothing! It has been a smooth, refreshing and pleasurable journey. 

Note: You are an individual, your results will vary depending on genetics, adherence, and effort.

You mentioned that people have commented at the gym?
 
“Yes, so far they’ve included ‘you’ve got no body fat; how much cardio are you doing? None…no way, you must be?; are you on GH; what’s the secret you’re fricking shredded; you’re in the best condition I have ever seen you’. The word has started to spread that I am only eating twice a day. Most do not believe it – fine my me. I keep myself to myself, train hard and focus on continuing with these results. My poundages are increasing too, which I would not have anticipated if I had followed my existing approach to getting leaner. I would have expected to lose some strength.”

How do you feel?
 
“Well being wise I have felt incredible. Cognitively I have been focused, analytical, concentrated, articulate and productive. When I train in a fasted state I have my most productive and intense workouts. I would never have believed such an outcome if I had not experienced it myself.”

Anything else you’d like to say?

“All that I would want to end on is that IF/LG is not a body building diet. That can surprise a lot of BBs I think, who are used to eating like Rabbits to drop the bodyfat percentages. It is a structured and tailored approach to health and wellbeing that has the added benefit of priming your body for both growth and efficient and effective body fat reduction, simultaneously. It has an extensive peer-reviewed research evidence base underpinning it, that is what caught my attention when I first explored IF/LG. I am as guilty as everyone else who followed religiously the 5-6 small meals a day nonsense propagated by the supplement and fitness industry. I even gave the same advice to others for years. It is a complete scam. Marketing rhetoric pumped out in the media with the sole purpose of making us buy supplements and use supplements multiple times each day so that we run out and then have to go and buy more supplements – because, so we are told, that’s how you build muscle and get ripped/lean. Complete bollocks. I am annoyed with myself for falling for this for so many years. I shudder to think how much money I have wasted. But I take comfort in knowing I am not alone in this regard and others will continue to line the pockets of supplement companies as they do not know any better.

intermittent-fasting-leangains-results phil

My results confirm to me that with the correct valid plan and structured application of core IF/LG principles, I will continue to make improvements in my physique, retain an exceptional level of leaness and continue to experience positive wellbeing and long term good health. I will also have so much more time to spend with my family. If a guy at my age of 43 years can follow an IF/LG protocol, train hard consistently and achieve such results, then the progress a younger guy could make should at least be equal to or even better. 

I would want to say thanks for everything Andy. I can’t see me ever going back to my old eating and training habits. You’ve saved me time, money, hassle and wasted effort. I’d be keen to emphasize that working with you has been extremely rewarding, productive, efficient and beneficial – and quite life changing in terms of freeing me up time wise; and is most certainly suitable for seasoned bodybuilders, not only those new to training.   

                                                                                                                                    –Phil

Thank you for sharing with us Phil. I hope your gym friends believe you now.

~~~

See more results →

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Comments

Please keep questions on topic, write clearly, concisely, and don't post diet calculations.

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helen
helen

I don’t think anyone argues that it’s possible to cut or bulk with 2 or 3 meals a day. The way I understand, the 6-meals-per-day-bros simply want to maximize their gains.

Muscle protein synthesis rates are not only determined by total protein intake, but also the pattern of protein intake.

From https://www.nutritiontactics.com/measure-muscle-protein-synthesis/#78_Protein_distribution

Andy – do you agree? Have you seen much difference between people who wanted to do regular meals spread out through the day and people who fasted?

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The 9 Categories of Physique Trainee - Part 1 | RippedBody.jp

[…] were subtle, but these are the differences in levels of conditioning that judges look for. The bigger story here was his switching from 6 meals a day, training 6 days a week to 3 days training, two […]

Bill
Bill

Hi Phil, Thank you for sharing your inspiring story. Would like to hear which exercises you used for your twice a week training while bulking. Know a busy lifestyle one must chose quality moves to get the most bang for their buck.

bv
bv

Thanks Andy! I read it and it all makes sense. It was an excellent resource to calculate everything. I’m finding the morning phase to be plagued with very low body temperature, especially in the hands, feet, nose. It’s preventing me from taking advantage of the “productive-energy” like so many people say I should be feeling and it’s very uncomfortable. Do you or any others know any tips on how to avoid being so cold during the morning fast? Even warm clothes, lots of coffee or water,, turning up the heat won’t make a difference.

bv
bv

I’m curious how many total calories these two meals represented each day?

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Almond milk - Page 7

[…] Posted by Learney Categorically NO…..and if you claim you can you're assisted https://rippedbody.com/2012/07/26/swit…s-phils-story/ <– here was a very good example of an actual bodybuilder who switched from five/six meals a day […]

Sam
Sam

Thank you Phil – that clears so much up. I used to lift very heavy but my joints are feeling it at 38 now. I now lift lighter, and reach failure in good form by using a 4s lift, 2s hold, 4s lower cadence (Mike Mentzer HIT). Is this what you do?

Something you said about 2 meals concurs with what I did recently when fasting during daylight hours. I basically had 2 meals – one at around 4 am (basic porridge/semi skimmed milk, cottage cheese with fruit, casein protein shake/milk) and then a huge meal at around 8pm (typically chicken, brown rice and salad, then casein protein shake/milk). My body fat dropped during the 30 day fast period by around 4-5%. However, despite eating the same amount of calories in the same IF eating window, the only variable being in say 4-6 smaller meals my bf seems to have crept up again. Do you have any experience in this given that you stick to 2 meals? Logically if I am eating the same calories (I have a cool app on my phone that lets me scan food barcodes etc and tracks what I eat, macros etc hence I know my calories are the same) then surely I should be losing body fat regardless of how many small meals I eat in my IF window?

Any guidance is very much appreciated. Thanks again, Sam.

Sam
Sam

Hi Andy – your story is so inspiring. I have trained for 20 years following the same 6 meals etc with loads of cardio – I feel so cheated. Luckily I had read Brawn and followed Mike Mentzer for many of those years so all is not lost. It would be great to know what actual weight you would lift for your training program and were they all free weights? Do you find you have enough recovery between workouts with RPT and its high intensity? Finally, do you use flax or fish oil and if so why? Congratulations on your future family addition – be good to yourself, Sam.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Is this address to Phil or myself?

Sam
Sam

Hi Andy apologies my question was to Phil but I would also appreciate it if you could give examples of your lifts and cadence. I have written to you about a potential consultation in any case.

Thanks, Sam.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

At that point it was something like 4 plates for the deadlift, 3 plates for the squat and 2 plates for the bench. Jeff is stronger than I.

Phil
Phil

Hi Sam,

‘It would be great to know what actual weight you would lift for your training program and were they all free weights?’

I’m really not that strong in comparison to some guys, never have been. But the poundages I lift are heavy for me. I think that is the main point – as long as you are lifting to your own maximal level and continuing to push yourslef to get stronger using good form then don’t worry too much about what others are lifting.

Deadlifting – 3 plates; benching – seriously, when I bench, I only lift around a 20-30kg a side – very light really. I’m not a strong bencher and it causes me discomfort, but I am strong on dips hitting good full reps with 40, 50 plus kg with no problems. Cleary my strucutre is much more suited to dips and wieghted press-ups. Squats, 40-50kg a side at present. But this is becuase I am focusing on re-learning my squatting technique without a belt. Not havgn a belt feels much more effective, but as I have laways used a belt I am adding poundage very slowly and using very strict form for slightly higher reps RPT, so set 1 – 10 reps, 2 – 12-13 reps, third set 15-16 reps. So far it is workign well and my core, lower back are gaining strength and my form is much improved.

For my cut I did a 3 way split, alternate days, then two full days rest after my leg session on Sunday: Back and bis-Weds; chest, delts, tris – Fri; legs-Sun.

Back: Deadlift, chins, some form of row, and possibly a couple fo heavy sets of shrugs and a single set of curls with a final BW set of close grip chins. RPT for deads and chins only.

Chest- Flt bench, standing press, dip, weighted pressup, and possibly a set of tri extensions. Bench, press and dip all RPT.

Legs- Squat, calf raise – squats RPT.

That was it. 2-3 sets per exercise. Mu ruccent routine on a slow bulk is even less than this but very intense. I currnelty only train twice a week on Thursday and Sunday,

‘Do you find you have enough recovery between workouts with RPT and its high intensity?’

Yes, and no! As the poundages increased and the bf% dropped I beneffited form cutting back to the bare basics, so drops shrugs, curls, tri ext. Just hit the basics hard and for squat and deadlift reduced from 3 to 2, or if very tired just 1 intense all out set to failure, possibly with a couple of rest-pause reps.

Finally, do you use flax or fish oil and if so why?

Yes, I use 5 x high strength Omega capsules. I had previoulsy used UDOS oil, but stopped that. But recently I notoed my skin tone and texture was looking poor, so I’ve jsut re-introduced UDOS oil each day, within a week my skin tone and condition has improved dramaticlaly. But I am now on a slow-bulk, so I am beneffitting form the higher fat, carb, calorie intake.

Congratulations on your future family addition

Thank you, 7-8 weeks to go, so busy at home, hence switichign to two full body workouts a week. Still eatign twice a day, but large meals now I am on a slow bulk, but still very lean and cut.

Hope this helps.

Phil

fsabia
fsabia

Hi Phil,

Thanks for all your answers and insight. A follow up question. How did you simplify your food in terms of calorie counting and weighing and measuring. Did you eat the same kinds of foods and meals repeatedly to ensure you got the calories right. Did you weigh and measure every meal. If so did you do each meal at a time or did you cook everything for the week and measure out portions for each meal. Or did you just simply eye-ball your portion sizes. Just wondering how varied your foods/meals were and how you insured they fit into your macro’s for the day.
Thanks!!

Kevin
Kevin

I would like to know this as well

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

“Would like.” Mind your manners.

Phil
Phil

Fsabia,

Yes, I ate the same food types most days across the week with some variability. But generally my core protein sources were turkey or chicken, with salmon and beef or pork on non-training days as well. Full eggs, and whites. Cottage cheese and fromage frais for dairy. Some casein and/or whey, but not that much, only to bring my macros up if there were a little low.

Carbs – oats, rice, beans/legumes, fruit, and tons of green veg

Fats: Nuts, avocados, olive oil, omega oils, fish, eggs.

As I only ate twice a day it was easy to plan meals, I just prepared two meals at nihgt one beign for the following dayy. I do tend to weigh everything, just easy for me to do, takes seconds and ensures I hit my macros. If I ate out, I just eyeballed portion size.

I prepped my food at night for each day rather that cookign in bulk and freezing things. I eat a lot of salad/veg so easy to prep that while meat or fish os cooking. I also cook my wife’s meals at the same time. I enjoy cooking so it’s not a chore for me. We have a healthy, nuturious cooked meal every night together.

Post-training meals: well that is a whole different adventure whereby I can put away well over 2000 cals in one sitting and still feel liek I could eat more. But still the basics, wth a bit more fruit and possibly a treat or two!

Hope this helps.

Phil.

louisXIV
louisXIV

I’m now a month in and lost 10lbs. Certainly look sharper. I think the net weekly calories restriction, the steady protein, plus the net weekly high glycemic carb restriction accounts for most of what happens.

Not sure it matters that one do more carbs or fats on any one day–or even more or fewer calories– providing the quantity *over time* is suited to the task (e.g., fat loss, eat less; gain, eat more).

Put differently, assuming one is eating *healthfully*, I think the average *calorie total* matters most by far–and not that one eats more carbs on Training Days and more fats on rest days. In fact, the calorie and macro division could be the same– on all days– providing there is an overall net calorie deficit for fat loss and a modest overall carb intake.

Has anyone done it this (simpler) way? I think the science would support it. What do you guys think?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

IIFYM.

Ben
Ben

Andy can you please do before and after pictures that are under identical lightning and locality. And especially the same body stance/position. Otherwise we can’t really make a fair judgement call on any differences! Its the same as doing an experiment under identical conditions for repeatability.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Ben buddy I am well aware of this. In fact I have two entire paragraphs of instructions on how to take before/after photos and the importance of consistency. Unfortunately if people don’t listen there is little I can do.

B.J
B.J

Hey andy i’ve heard awesome things about IF so far. But i’m 16 at the moment trying to get lean because i am kinda chubby right now 17-18% bodyfat do you think it would be ok for someone my age to do IF ?

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

I don’t know.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Let me elaborate. At 16 years old the only thing you should be concerned about is getting strong as hell. Do starting strength and build yourself up for a couple of years. You’ll get bigger and look leaner because of it even if you stay the same bodyfat. More likely is that you’ll slim down at the same time. Keep eating breakfast but use the other LG principles if you wish.

LouisXIV
LouisXIV

Phil wrote:
“The key isn’t the meal frequency or size of meals from my experience…”

“5/6 meals worked great for me too, as did a higher volume and HIIT to get my bf% down. But IF/LG for me is just so much more efficient, less hassle and is working far better than my previous system.”

Huge point being made by Phil.

ANY reasonable training program that focuses on the basics has enough recovery in it will work. No magic routines. But if a lesser amount of mechanical work accomplishes the same results, then you have a more efficient, and likely safer, routine.

ANY reasonable eating program that focuses on the basics–carb management, sufficient protein, and adequate calories, no matter how they are consumed throughout the day–will work. No magic eating plans.

What IF has going for it is monumental convenience for those who can tolerate it. Convenience helps with compliance. And there is always magic in *compliance*. The rest is left to one’s individual genetic predispositions.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Well said.

alca
alca

hey, I have only one question…
I´m doing 16/8 intermittent fasting since like 1 1/2 years, and its great, the only unknown variable so far in my diet is the food before you workout…

Martin recommends (if you dont train fasted) if you eat 1-2 meals preworkout to eat around 40% of your daily kcal before your workout which should consist of fruit, veggies and protein….

Some others recommend fats preworkout, like salmon/fatty beef coconut oil and so on with veggies but no fruit, to not raise insulin as much as you would with protein and carbs only.
(I guess you know which approach I mean here)

So what did you basically eat preworkout.

Same question goes to andy aswell

would appreciate an answer

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

The most important thing is the macros that you eat for the day. Timing plays a very small part. As long as there is protein in your PWO meal I’d suggest that you eat whatever macro combinations make you feel/perform best for that workout.

Phil
Phil

Alca,

Simple question, simple precise answer:

My pre-workout meal on days when I DID NOT train fasted was at around 14.00 to 15.00 depending on my diary commitments in work, and consisted of:

200g Turkey (sometimes chicken, but turkey is lower in fat)
100g (pre-cook weight) of brown rice
A couple/three handfuls of frozen veg – Brocolli, sweet peppers, green beans, chargrilled veg (all available frozen, I don’t cook them as that would be too much fannying around and would mess up the nutrients in the veg. I just pour them into the container with the cooked rice/turkey and leave to defrost overnight in the fridge ready for the next day)
A couple of raw chillies, for the bite, burn and flavour. I love scotch bonnet peppers – my wife is Trinidadian, so now I’m immune to the pain of peppers!.
One apple, chopped up and thrown in with the rice, turkey and frozen veg, adds a nice bit of sweetness. But somedays I’ll swap round and have an Organic banana as a dessert. Organic always tastes better.

That’s it. Around 20-30% of my days macros.

I train at 18.30-19.30 normally. So four hours after the meal my stomach is empty.

PWO is then a feast when I get home, around 8.30. Close on 300g carbs from a range of sources, as discussed previously.

Non-training days? Exactly the same usually, just no rice and I add mixed nuts and an avocado to the container too to up the ‘good’ fats.

Anyone can throw this meal together in 10-20 minutes. No excuses.

KISS principle – Keep It Simple Stupid. This is my base for my pre-workout meals on days when I DON’T train in a fasted state.

I trust this answers your question?

Phil

Michael
Michael

I wouldn’t say that the 3-4 meal schedule isn’t “effective”. it’s actually every effective. The LG routine would leave me herniated with the amount of food i need to consume over just 2 meals and wouldn’t be suitable for my GERD either. it is just another method to shed body fat

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Absolutely. The point being that meal frequency doesn’t matter at all. If you’re more comfortable with 3-4 then go for it.

Keenan Smith
Keenan Smith

And is right but what I would say Michael is that if you gave your stomach time to adjust for 2 meals like how someone who’s new to fasting….it can happen in about month…maybe 2 if you’ve REALLY got a small gut.

But hey..that’s just my two cents on it.

Phil
Phil

Michael

my digestive system took around 2-3 weeks to fully adjust, both my stomach and my lower intestine. Now I can smoothly eat around 2000 cals post-workout and have no digestive issues. 2 meals works for me, 3,4 would also work I’m sure for most. The key isn’t the meal frequency or size of meals from my experience. The fasting period is. Food source selection is also vital I feel. I opt for healthy, natural sourced that can feel bulky initially but my digestive system adapted quite quickly.

5/6 meals worked great for me too, as did a higher volume and HIIT to get my bf% down. But IF/LG for me is just so much more efficient, less hassle and is working far better than my previous system.

I’d encourage you to consider trying it. Ironically I always found I came home from holidays abroad leaner, sharper and fuller – now I think I was doing IF without realising it as I couldn’t eat 6 times a day, maybe 2-3 times and all whole food with a 12-16 hr fast on most days, and only did a basic workout of chins, dips, pressup and bodyweight squats at a kids park maybe once every 3/5 days.

I just never had that penny drop moment – now I recognise it was basic IF/LG protocol.

Hope this helps.

Phil

krishn
krishn

Hi Andy,
Do you think it would be possible to have replicate the intial results of Intermittent Fasting in a second phase. e.g. Succesfully come cut on IF, come off it during a bulk, and then restart the fasting on a cut.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

“Initial Results”…
Perhaps you’re referring to some water loss which happened with lower carb intake? -This will happen with any diet that has lower overall carbs though.
You can use IF for a cut after using a non-IF method for a bulk for sure. You just get the adjustment period again, ~1week.

medstudent
medstudent

Hi Andy,

Am wondering if a one meal per day approach would still generate similar outcomes? My schedule is so freaking busy that I have been eating one meal, over say an hour or so each day. Everything else (calories/macro cycling and training) are in-check.

Thanks

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Not in the long term is the easiest way to answer. The rest would require paragraphs. If you’re obese then it’s fine.

medstudent
medstudent

Thankyou, ive adjusted to 2 meals 😀

Your a legend Andy.

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Ah, good good.

LouisXIV
LouisXIV

Andy,

Again, I can’t say enough for the quality of this site. As I uncover articles and links (and comments), I am greatly impressed by how thoroughly you have thought this all through and explicated it, and your demeanor is welcoming. I’ve now printed- out the articles just in case the internet blows up! What a gem you have here.

Louis

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Ha, and if it does then please post them to me.

Jake
Jake

Great work Phil! Seriously impressed, especially as you’re almost twice my age. Very inspiring. Im currently on LG, enjoying the whole experience making good gains and seeing consisten drops in my fat levels. Just a quick question for Andy… on training days, are the majority of carbs supposed to be eaten post workout or are they supposed to be split between the two meals? Other than that question I think I’m fairly clued up as I’ve read almost all of yours and Martin Berkhan’s amazing reources. Keep up the good work & thanks for this site

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

The majority of your carbs should be eaten in the interval after training before bed.

JoeV
JoeV

Phil – perfection.

Andy. Ive got a question relating to the above comment. I am familiar with LG (as you know – being a happy previous client of yours :D) and i annoy myself asking because i know the structure of LG.
However, life has been forcing me to eat 100% of my carbs post workout within 1-2hours before bed when i train in the evening. Any experience with this? Good or bad? Its a challenge to eat 300g C within this time i tell you! Enjoyable none the less.
Also – is it possible im over training despite continuing to make strength gains every workout? (im re-comping/bulking using big three RPT)

Hope everything is all good and congratulations on the increasing popularity of the site, more than deserved.

JoeV

JoeV
JoeV

ps. I know how vague and kind of stupid my question on over training is, but ill really appreciate your opinion.

Thanks,
JoeV

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

1. Not ideal as you have to turn to shit food choices. But you said yourself you’re “forced” so why worry about it?
2. Don’t think so.

Jake
Jake

I understand that the majority of carbs should be eaten in the post workout meal, but as JoeV has alluded to, +300g of carbs in one sitting is a lot of food. My current training day carb allowance is 386g. How much carbs do you think is manageable/optimal for the post workout meal? In other words, how much carbs could i have in my 1pm meal and still get the benefits of post workout carbs. Is it ideal to have zero carbs in the 1pm meal, a rough percentage of what you do would be really helpful. Thanks for replying, I really appreciate your response

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Try 35/65 fopr a 2 meal split.

Phil
Phil

Jake

if it’s of interest, I also struggled with a large feed of carbs initially as I used rice and fibrous veg.

My solution was to switch the rice for organic potatos served with home made Italian tomato sauce with variety of veg, adding fresh lemon juice for both flavour and to aid digestion. This provide 100g of starchy carbs in the potatos. I then have 150g of organic oats with some chocolate casein, fromage frais or cottage cheese with banana, raisons and frozen berries and the flesh of the squeezed lemon – that big bowl of tasty dessert provides close to 200g of carbs and goes down a treat – lush! All good carbs too.

Hope this helps, good luck

Phil

Frank Sabia
Frank Sabia

Hi Phil,

Question about your carb sources. Did you ever try or experiment with post workout carbs such as dextrose or coconut water or were all your carbs sources only whole foods. Also I have heard that fruit even berries are poor source of carbs as it goes to refilling liver glycogen first then the spill over goes to fat rather then muscle glycogen and that starches are the way to go such as rice or sweet potatoes. I know alot of my bodybuilding friends cut out all fruit and just use rice/sweet potatoes for competition cuts.

Thanks again and great photos!!

-Frank

Andy Morgan
Andy Morgan

Nah, that’s just bad science. I can understand where that comes from though. You’re obviously very interested in this stuff. Go get yourself a subscription to Alan Aragon’s Research Review. $10 and you even get the back issues too.

Phil
Phil

Frank

I used dextrose/glucose PWO for years, along with WHEY. I have to say, looking back, I’m not confident it made any difference whatsoever. I was putting away 50-100g of simple sugars and 50-100g WHEY in my PWO drink, as, like many, I was led to believe it was vital to take advantage of the ‘Window of opportunity’.

Now I consider this to be marketing hyperbole, based on a research study that most supplement companes qoute that studied 70 year old men who ingested 10g protein and simple sugars after a brief workout who were able to maintain and build a minimal amount of LBM compared to a control group who did not have a PWO drink. The control lost on average a couple of pounds of LBM.

So, the whole dextrose or coconut water you mention, I don’t think makes a difference. Clealry there is hardly any evidence to extraplotate to young, healthy experienced athletes. Endurance athletes have different needs, but if you’re training with a high intensity for 45-60 mins max, you’re not going to significantly deplete your glycogen levels by any means that requires a quick hit of simple sugars.

When I train fasted I use a small amount of BCAAs, and take some Glutamine PWO. But I am even starting to question the need for the Glutamine, as your body produces it’s own so there may be no benefit in supplementing with it. But I am open minded to the immune system benefits of Glutamine, and the role it plays in maintaining a healthy intestinal tract. I hope to read into it further, unless Andy has a view as i am sure he does as he is far more knowledgeable than I on such matters.

The main issues as I see it, is the PWO period – I don’t take in carbs till around 60-90 mins AFTER my workout, in the form of potatos, veg, oats, fruit and the sugars contained in low-fat dairy. Now immediate rush to the gym bag to grab a drink like I used to.

Fruit – The pros of eating fruit each day for me greatly outweigh the potential cons of speculative claims of how fructose blurs definition/cuts. Sure, Fructose is involved in replensihing the liver levels, but you get the added benefits of lots of fibre, vitamins and minerals and enzymes, the protective benfits of fruit against cancers and other nasty conditions, and it tastes good. I eat a fair amount of fruit PWO, and as long as I adhere to my macros I don’t have a problem. I don’t feel the need to micro manage. What I do in the gym is the bigger factor. My body responds and adapts because it has no choice given the stress I impose on it with the Big 3 and basic intense compound moves. What I put in my mouth is processed and transported over the next 24-48 hours where it needs to go to repair and recover.

Berries – 150g of frozen berries gives 10g~ sugars. Hardly a deal breaker. They taste fantastic with oats and diary, a perfect dessert.

I hope this helps,

Phil

Frank Sabia
Frank Sabia

What was your biggest “ah ha” moment while doing LG/IF in terms of what you did in your previous diets and this new one. Was the foods the same just taken from 6 meals down to 2 and was all of your training 100% fasted? Do you weigh and measure all your food and do you take any supplements post workout or is it 100% real foods?

Thanks and very inspiring photos!!

Phil
Phil

Frank,

The biggest ‘aha’ moment?

There have been a few:

* not feeling hungry, dizzy or nauseas at all during the fast
* feeling amazingly alert and alive at 5.30 am each morning
* Making my following day’s single meal in 10 mins when I get home, and cooking large tasty meals for my evenings.
* Eating 2000 calories post workout and still getting leaner, and not feeling full after eating the 2000 cals of solid food which amazed me.
* Getting stronger, not weaker. Creeping strength gains as my BF% got lower and lows, vascualrity and striations popped out and paper got tissue thin – with ZERO cardio, apart form a casual walk with my wife a few times a week for 30 mins.
* Week 3, 4,5 etc looking at myself at the gym post-workout when full, pumped and vascular and recognising I’m in the best I’ve ever been, abd getting better and sharper as each week passes.
* Seeing that hard, dry, solid, dense, tissue thin skin, vascualrity I have only seen in guys who use GH – thinking that my own natural GH must be pumping and spiking all through my fasts each day. Awesome!
* The kind and positive and genuine feedback and comments guys I knwo in the gym have offered. Very humbling. But they still don’t get the whole 2 meals thing. Makes me chuckle – I don;t want to evangelise so just confirm it’s 2 meals, 3 workouts, zero cardion – take it or leave it guys, that what I’m doing and I’m 100% natural!

So, lot’s of ‘aha’s’ !

Hope this helps,

Phil

Phil
Phil

So many typos, notebook keyboards are dire. Tissue thin skin,

Yes, I weigh and measure foods to get macros right, but a little bit flexible to keep things simple.

I mainky used solid food, but I still use some whey or casein with meals to raise the protein a bit to make up for shortfalls if I don’t have enough meat. I normally mix it with oats, cottage cheese and fruit and have as a huge tasty dessert after my main meal, or jsut as a drink with water on non-training days to ramp up my protein by 20-40g to reach my approx 100+g of protein for each of my two meals.

Most post-workout meals are 3 courses. And yes, I was still getting leaner whilst going to bed like a hibernating bear with a stoked belly…waking up full, vascular, shredded and full of life and energy and raring to go at 5.30.

Phil

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